Public Spaces

Gentrification of New York Neighborhoods

What does gentrification mean for New York renters and low-income communities? The answer is indefinite as the term “Gentrification” may mean different things to different people and can be misinterpreted. Ingrid Ellen defined it as the increase in rents and house values prompted by an arrival of more affluent residents into low-income neighborhoods. Consequently, the process causes difficulties for lower-income homeowners and renters to remain in their neighborhoods.

Gentrification of New York Neighborhoods

Part 2: Public Spaces, a Resurgence in Public Appreciation

Is the Public Driving Developers to Think Beyond Zoning Concessions?

In the previous installment, we discussed the planning and design of small, privately owned public spaces, such as open-access lobbies, mini-parks, arcades, canopied spaces, and plazas. General support and enthusiasm for open spaces in our urban centers have led us to consider how the building and design community will respond to this resurgence in appreciation for public space.

Part 2: Public Spaces, a Resurgence in Public Appreciation

Part 1: Public Spaces, a Resurgence in Public Appreciation

Is the Public Driving Developers to Think Beyond Zoning Concessions?

A renewed public appreciation for public places, both old, new, and newly imagined, may have spurred building owners and developers to reevaluate the value of public-private partnerships when altering our cityscapes. The proliferation of small public spaces, including open-access lobbies, mini-parks, arcades, canopied spaces, and plazas, is particularly noteworthy.

Part 1: Public Spaces, a Resurgence in Public Appreciation